Tips For Upgrading To A Truss Roof

Your roof is the protector of your house, but it's only able to do this job effectively if you give it the proper care it needs. Though it may not always look it, your roof takes a continual beating year-round. Each year, insurance companies address 9 million roof damage claims for hail storms alone. Investing in a truss roof design can reinforce your roof properly so that it's sturdy and reliable for years to come. Here's what you should know about building trusses for your roof.  

Get to know the science behind the truss roof design and what it means for your current roof setup

First off, you should learn about trusses to know why they are effective. Trusses are wood beams used in a triangulated design to support your roof frame. They consist of several interlocked joints and will provide your roof the support it needs to weather even the worst storms. This is important since thunderstorms create about $24 million in property damage each year. 

The triangle shape of these trusses adds balance to the rest of your roof so that its weight is distributed more evenly. Replacing your current roof with a truss roof can give you a good return on investment (ROI). When your roof is well-built and able to withstand damage, it gives your home more equity. 

Shop the market and look at blueprints for the truss roof that best fits your home

When you're ready to see what's out there, start looking at truss roof design blueprints. This will let you know what square footage and materials you need, and you can start to kick around a few style options. Building a box gable or cross-hipped roof design over the top of trusses can mix aesthetics with functionality for your roof. 

Ask for the guidance of a roofing professional that is licensed and certified. When you can trust their advice and experience, you're ready to start getting estimates on the roof installation. 

Purchase a truss roof installation from a trusted installer

In general, you will pay somewhere between $7,200 and $12,000 on roof trusses. The estimates you get should include both parts and labor, and you should receive a time of completion for the whole project. Make sure that the roofer is responsible for disposing of the old roof parts and that they can get you on the books for installation in a timely manner. 

Let these tips help you when you want to upgrade to a truss roof


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